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Water-Smart Gardening Website Highlights Native and Low Water Use Plants

Helping our customers with water conservation is an essential part of what we do at the Soquel Creek Water District.  A lot of water savings can be achieved through changes inside our homes, but a significant amount of residential water consumption is related to outdoor water use.  Big landscaping changes, however, can be both time consuming and expensive, so we are constantly working to provide our customers with rebates, information, and technical assistance that will help them make the transition to more water efficient landscaping.  In that spirit, this month’s Water Wisdom focuses on a

Shadow of a Drought: Despite a wet winter, Santa Cruz County's water problems are far from over

Two dozen rented rowboats floated all Saturday on Loch Lomond, captained by weekend fishermen hoping to surprise some largemouth bass. For three years, nobody fished the Felton reservoir, due to closure from drought, until it reopened in March, following a stormy El Niño winter.

The creeks are flowing again and the reservoir—an important water source for Santa Cruz—is brimming.

Santa Cruz’s water department has lifted its mandatory rationing, and many locals, who have grown accustomed to leaving lawns unwatered and toilets unflushed, are sighing with relief, believing that El Niño has ended the unprecedented drought.

Say Hello to the Santa Cruz Mid-County Groundwater Agency

A new player just joined the local water scene, and it goes by a name you probably haven’t heard much yet: the Santa Cruz Mid-County Groundwater Agency (MGA).  While everyone in Santa Cruz County was swept up in the Water Supply Advisory Committee (WSAC) process in the City of Santa Cruz and the re-evaluation of supplemental water supplies in the Soquel Creek Water District, something very big happened at the state level that turned those agency-specific efforts into small pieces of a much larger r